Which Celebrity to Use?

Topics

message source, appeal, central messaging, communication, perception


Review the activity below or download the PDF student worksheet

Student worksheet: Which Celebrity to Use

Student Discussion Activity

Sometimes it can be effective for a firm to utilize a celebrity to help promote their product/brand. Your task is to identify whether any of the following firms could possibly benefit from using an ‘available’ celebrity.

If so, which available celebrity would be most appropriate?  (Note: A limited list of celebrities has been provided to make this activity more manageable.)  

List of firms/brands – looking for a celebrity endorser

  • Kit Kat (chocolate bar)
  • Virgin (airline)
  • Reebok
  • Toyota
  • Madrid (as a holiday destination)
  • Revlon cosmetics
  • AT&T (for mobile phones)
  • KFC (fast food)

List of ‘Available’ Celebrities

  • Tom Cruise (actor)
  • David Beckham (football/soccer player)
  • Tiger Woods (golfer)
  • Michael Phelps (Olympic swimmer)
  • Michael Jordan  (ex-basketball player)
  • Lady Gaga (singer)
  • Bill Clinton (former American president)
  • Elle McPherson (model)

Student Discussion Questions

  1. Choose who you believe to be the best celebrity endorser for the products/firms listed.
  2. Then work through the following checklist to see how well they would fit to the product and the promotional goals.
  • Is the person well known?
  • Is the person well liked?
  • Would the person be seen as credible/believable?
  • Is the person a good ‘fit’ to the product?
  • Is the person a good ‘fit’ to the likely target market?
  • Does the person present a risk of ‘poor behavior’?
  • Is the person already strongly associated with another product/brand?

3. Are there any particular products/firms listed above that you would believe would NOT benefit from having a celebrity endorser? (That is, would do equally as well without that additional expense in their marketing communications budget.)


Related Activities

Selecting the Message Source

Selecting the Message Appeal

External Information

About Q Scores